Air Duct Cleaning

 

air duct cleaning, san antonio, texas

Do you sneeze repeatedly every time the air conditioning turns on? Does your house seem to have a weird musty odor you just can’t get rid of? You may have an excessive build up of dust, mold, or allergens in your air ducts. Other signs that you may need your air ducts cleaned may be subtle. Our technicians are trained to look for the signs of a excessively dirty duct system. You would be surprised at what you might find in there upon a thorough inspection.

If you notice visible signs of contamination in your air ducts such as mold, a rodent or vermin infestation (rats, roaches, other disgusting things…), or excessive dirt build up, you should have your ducts cleaned immediately! We are a thorough service provider for air duct cleaning. If the ducts are wet, air vents literally blow visible dirt out, or other major issues are found on inspection, the underlying causes of these problems must be dealt with prior to any cleaning of the ducts. We always keep our customers well informed as to our findings upon inspecting air ducts and/or the HVAC system.

We follow all recommendations of the EPA as follows:

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Open access ports or doors to allow the entire system to be cleaned and inspected.
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Inspect the system before cleaning to be sure that there are no asbestos-containing materials (e.g., insulation, register boots, etc.) in the heating and cooling system. Asbestos-containing materials require specialized procedures and should not be disturbed or removed except by specially trained and equipped contractors.
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Use vacuum equipment that exhausts particles outside of the home or use only high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) vacuuming equipment if the vacuum exhausts inside the home.
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Protect carpet and household furnishings during cleaning.
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Use well-controlled brushing of duct surfaces in conjunction with contact vacuum cleaning to dislodge dust and other particles.
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Use only soft-bristled brushes for fiberglass duct board and sheet metal ducts internally lined with fiberglass. (Although flex duct can also be cleaned using soft-bristled brushes, it can be more economical to simply replace accessible flex duct.)
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Take care to protect the duct work, including sealing and re-insulating any access holes the service provider may have made or used so they are airtight.
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Follow NADCA‘s standards for air duct cleaning and NAIMA‘s recommended practice for ducts containing fiber glass lining or constructed of fiber glass duct board.

How to Prevent Duct Contamination

Whether or not you decide to have the air ducts in your home cleaned, committing to a good preventive maintenance program is essential to minimize duct contamination.

To prevent dirt from entering the system:

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Use the highest efficiency air filter recommended by the manufacturer of your heating and cooling system.
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Change filters regularly.
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If your filters become clogged, change them more frequently.
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Be sure you do not have any missing filters and that air cannot bypass filters through gaps around the filter holder.
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When having your heating and cooling system maintained or checked for other reasons, be sure to ask the service provider to clean cooling coils and drain pans.
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During construction or renovation work that produces dust in your home, seal off supply and return registers and do not operate the heating and cooling system until after cleaning up the dust.
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Remove dust and vacuum your home regularly. (Use a high efficiency vacuum (HEPA) cleaner or the highest efficiency filter bags your vacuum cleaner can take. Vacuuming can increase the amount of dust in the air during and after vacuuming as well as in your ducts).
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If your heating system includes in-duct humidification equipment, be sure to operate and maintain the humidifier strictly as recommended by the manufacturer.

More Information about duct cleaning can be found directly on the EPA website at: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html